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  #31  
Old 09-14-2014, 08:33 PM
JethroW JethroW is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chocolate View Post
But does every developer who made a good quality app have $1000 upfront with no guarantee of return of investment?

We may have never seen some nice little games if it cost that much. Not sure that is the answer.
Thats sort of the point, if it's so expensive to be on the store, there will be far fewer apps to compete with, so the chances of success for a nice little app will be far greater, based on the better visibility alone.
Make a good app in a good ecosystem and you make money.

I do see your point however as well, if you don't have a grand, and you have a good product.
What about $70 ($XX) a month subscription, This way you can provision your devices and get the thing tested, relatively cheaply, and put it on the store, and see how it goes. I think the spammy apps will soon disappear if its costing them money to sit there and just fill the shelves.

Dunno.
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  #32  
Old 09-15-2014, 04:07 AM
Destined Destined is online now
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Originally Posted by JethroW View Post
Thats sort of the point, if it's so expensive to be on the store, there will be far fewer apps to compete with, so the chances of success for a nice little app will be far greater, based on the better visibility alone.
Make a good app in a good ecosystem and you make money.

I do see your point however as well, if you don't have a grand, and you have a good product.
What about $70 ($XX) a month subscription, This way you can provision your devices and get the thing tested, relatively cheaply, and put it on the store, and see how it goes. I think the spammy apps will soon disappear if its costing them money to sit there and just fill the shelves.

Dunno.
It is a lot of money for an app that is 100% free with no advertising. I have one like that which is never going to make a cent.

I wouldn't mind a cost per release model like $25 an app or something rather than a yearly fee (updates free). This would stop the people who release 100's of apps to try and gather enough funds to live off while flooding the store with reskins.
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  #33  
Old 09-15-2014, 04:12 AM
psj3809 psj3809 is online now
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Originally Posted by JethroW View Post
The developer fee should be $1000 that would all but eliminate the tyre kickers from the store. And keep it for serious developers, making quality products.
Disagree with that. One thing i love about iOS is that it reminds me of the 80s and 'bedroom coders', coders who didnt need a huge company, they created and released quality games themselves.

If there was a large developer fee then the likes of Gameloft and others will rule the roost as the smaller devs couldnt risk paying money like that in case their one man band game fails.

I would like to know who says yes to some of these apps though, one minute you hear that Apple dont like clones yet they're quite happy earlier this year allowing flappy bird clone after clone to appear on the app store. Theres no consistency. I mean i played an app the other week which was abysmal, i cant believe it even made it to the app store.

If Apples 'QA checkers' do a better job then they should be able to deny some of this crap hitting the app store. A larger dev fee will just stop some of the quality games getting through, eg look at Dodo Adventures by a one man band
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  #34  
Old 09-15-2014, 06:42 PM
JethroW JethroW is offline
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Originally Posted by psj3809 View Post
Disagree with that. One thing i love about iOS is that it reminds me of the 80s and 'bedroom coders', coders who didnt need a huge company, they created and released quality games themselves.

If there was a large developer fee then the likes of Gameloft and others will rule the roost as the smaller devs couldnt risk paying money like that in case their one man band game fails.

I would like to know who says yes to some of these apps though, one minute you hear that Apple dont like clones yet they're quite happy earlier this year allowing flappy bird clone after clone to appear on the app store. Theres no consistency. I mean i played an app the other week which was abysmal, i cant believe it even made it to the app store.

If Apples 'QA checkers' do a better job then they should be able to deny some of this crap hitting the app store. A larger dev fee will just stop some of the quality games getting through, eg look at Dodo Adventures by a one man band
This sort of supports my case, Search Dodo Adventures, and no less than 6 apps come up with these words in the title, I don't know which one you're referring too. If there was a $1000 dev fee would any of these be there crowding the store? If one of them is quality I'm never going to find it now. In other words, if you believe in your product, you need to have faith in it enough to commit some cash to it. Then maybe there would only be the good one there with the commitment behind it and people would have a better chance of finding it.
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  #35  
Old 09-16-2014, 01:42 AM
GloriusLeader GloriusLeader is offline
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I think better solution is to add some kind of 'curated' and 'non-curated' category. Actually it means 'passed' and 'non-passed'.

Low quality and obvious clone will be stored in 'non passed' category and not highlighted but could 'level up' to 'passed' category if they pass specific threshold (ex: 10K downloads from different IP), meaning although they're clones or low quality, there is interest in them.

I think that's a win win solution:
- General users would not see much of obvious clones/LQ in highlighted area / itunes.
- The choice is still there, if you want clones or if the doomed app is actually good for you, you can find it.
- It's encourage developers to create better app/games.
- Apple could be wrong to non-passing a particular app, but the developer should be able to send a ticket to request at least one re-review.
- It could be cheated in some ways (ex: download bot), but I think it will be minority.
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  #36  
Old 09-16-2014, 04:16 AM
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PikPok PikPok is offline
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Originally Posted by GloriusLeader View Post
I think better solution is to add some kind of 'curated' and 'non-curated' category. Actually it means 'passed' and 'non-passed'.
Microsoft tried that at one point. Their policy around it was quite terrible.
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  #37  
Old 09-16-2014, 04:55 AM
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Catacomber Catacomber is offline
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If you look at the number of "A" alphabetic apps in the App Store that get shown on the "list" first and look at the number of so-called Role-playing games there--my, my a nail salon app is a role-playing game?, you would quickly realize something's not right. Maybe someday that situation will be cured. But I think basically it's up to us individually to promote our apps in a good way.

It's up to Apple to fix that.

The good thing about the App Store is that it's given us Indie game makers a way to get our apps distributed without breaking the bank. That was part of Steve Jobs' vision and I think they've done that very well.

It wasn't his vision to charge us 1000 dollars a year to make a game for ios.

If that ever happened, most of us would switch to making Android games where the charge is $25 and not a year--it's a flat fee.

: ) So Google will take over the world if you want to charge $1000 a year for an iOS license.

Then again, we could charge $14.99 for our games on iOS and add in app purchases for 2.00 a pop. : )

But I think everybody who's an Indie would move to Android and the Google Play Store.

I'm comfortable with iOS but could be motivated to get off the couch and push the button to make our game work on Android if I had to pay 1000 a year for an iOS license. It would take not much more than a button push. And a very slow learning curve. It's on my todo list as we have the Android license already. : )

Last edited by Catacomber; 09-16-2014 at 05:38 AM..
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  #38  
Old 09-18-2014, 07:20 AM
CharredDirt CharredDirt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Destined View Post
Greenlight is silly and I hope apple never implements it.

I doubt it will make the kind of improvements any of us are hoping for but putting a video on the profile will help a lot.

I hope Apple does something about the super long titles. I believe they are trying and make exact match the highest (which for the super long titles will never be searched for).
This is not how it works, at all.

There are different things that effect ranking as well as discoverability. Currently, you have 100 characters for keywords which including commas, isn't a lot of keywords to describe your app. Any words in your name are considered keywords. Since organic discoverability is crucial for small apps, app developers are pretty much forced to make long names. We WANT to just call our app Super Penguin Bowling but the cold reality is, we'll get 50% more downloads if we call it Super Penguin Bowling - Club March Free Game for Kids.

Notice what I did with the second one. If a kid types in Club Penguin, a popular Disney app, my app will come up. It's piggybacking off of hot traffic and keywords to get my app more exposure.

Google Play does not work this way, their search system is much better as it indexes the description. So you can have a short name and a good description with your keywords in it and people can find your app that way.

Don't blame devs for long names, blame Apple for this one.
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  #39  
Old 09-18-2014, 05:12 PM
Destined Destined is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharredDirt View Post
This is not how it works, at all.

There are different things that effect ranking as well as discoverability. Currently, you have 100 characters for keywords which including commas, isn't a lot of keywords to describe your app. Any words in your name are considered keywords. Since organic discoverability is crucial for small apps, app developers are pretty much forced to make long names. We WANT to just call our app Super Penguin Bowling but the cold reality is, we'll get 50% more downloads if we call it Super Penguin Bowling - Club March Free Game for Kids.

Notice what I did with the second one. If a kid types in Club Penguin, a popular Disney app, my app will come up. It's piggybacking off of hot traffic and keywords to get my app more exposure.

Google Play does not work this way, their search system is much better as it indexes the description. So you can have a short name and a good description with your keywords in it and people can find your app that way.

Don't blame devs for long names, blame Apple for this one.
I know how it works. That was just something I thought apple was doing to counter it. But they should just remove weight from key words for people doing this.

I agree it is partly an Apple problem and they should end it ASAP.
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