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  #11  
Old 04-14-2014, 12:08 AM
tea tea is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobunaga View Post
If anyone feels inclined to know how little their opinion on IAP matters, just go take a look at the top 100 grossing apps.
This is how investors see it, not players.
On average only 5-10% of players who DL a free game ever purchase game coins or other IAPs.
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  #12  
Old 04-14-2014, 03:20 AM
kmacleod kmacleod is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tea View Post
This is how investors see it, not players.
On average only 5-10% of players who DL a free game ever purchase game coins or other IAPs.
To rephrase that, if those games had launched paid, they'd only see a maximum of 5-10% of downloads. Less people would own the game, less would tell their friends about it, less new players would download it - and so on.

Look, I hate "premium" games with freemium components as much as the next guy, but there are styles of games that benefit greatly from building a critical mass. At the same time, real game developers DO want to get their games in front of as many people as possible. Freemium components allow that. It allows people who are proud of the product they've created to share it more widely than would be possible with an up-front cost. Just look at Threes vs 2048 for a perfect example of the dangers of picking the wrong business model.

That doesn't excuse the type of money-grab BS we see these days from supposedly respectable developers, but I'm not in favor of throwing away the system.

Personally, I think Apple can solve this problem by being much more selective about the games they Feature. They can dictate tastes by curating the App Store - they don't have to merely highlight whatever has the name of a big license behind it.
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  #13  
Old 04-14-2014, 03:59 PM
Nobunaga Nobunaga is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tea View Post
This is how investors see it, not players.
On average only 5-10% of players who DL a free game ever purchase game coins or other IAPs.
Investors meaning developers and publishers of games on the AppStore. Ie the people who dictate what makes it to the AppStore. I'm not into rehashing my opinion about freemium or paymium games or consumable IAP vs restorable or DRM, for that matter.
The fact is freemium tends to make more money. Apple knows it and supports free games over paid because they will make more off it. Developers/publishers are well aware of this fact. They will respond by making more free games. % of players who pay is irrelevant. Games and apps with an upfront cost tend to not do as well monetarily.
In all honesty I'm almost surprised that any paid games even get released anymore.
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  #14  
Old 04-14-2014, 10:51 PM
Jake7905 Jake7905 is offline
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I would love it if Apple banned all consumable IAP's, that would be a true game changer. Banning all IAP's, including DLC, would be a handicap to developers and consumers alike. Realistically speaking though, that will never happen with the amount of money rolling in.

Though the real answer to all of the problems concerning IAP (and electronic transactions in general) is tough regulation. As it stands, the internet resembles the Wild West more then a 21st century marketplace. As long as 'anything goes' in the eyes of the law, things like IAP will always be used by crooked people for a quick cash grab.
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  #15  
Old 04-14-2014, 11:37 PM
Topherunhinged Topherunhinged is offline
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Originally Posted by Jake7905 View Post
I would love it if Apple banned all consumable IAP's, that would be a true game changer. Banning all IAP's, including DLC, would be a handicap to developers and consumers alike. Realistically speaking though, that will never happen with the amount of money rolling in.

Though the real answer to all of the problems concerning IAP (and electronic transactions in general) is tough regulation. As it stands, the internet resembles the Wild West more then a 21st century marketplace. As long as 'anything goes' in the eyes of the law, things like IAP will always be used by crooked people for a quick cash grab.
IAP isn't crooked and shouldn't be regulated. Why should it be illegal for people to voluntarily spend their money?
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  #16  
Old 04-16-2014, 12:30 PM
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sinuous sinuous is offline
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I'm an oldskool gamer that's been playing games since atari, nes and the original game boy. It took me a while to get into the whole freemium thing and I think the main problem is just how some games use freemium rather than freemium itself being bad.

Basically games shouldn't be forcing you into IAP's, and should instead be making you feel good.

Actually my boss recently sent me a video that sums it up pretty nicely, well worth a watch:


Youtube link | Pop Up
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  #17  
Old 04-16-2014, 11:41 PM
tea tea is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobunaga View Post
% of players who pay is irrelevant. Games and apps with an upfront cost tend to not do as well monetarily.
Oh yes it is relevant. There are two minorities of paying players:

- players who pay for IAPs.
- players who pay upfront

Both these categories represent a small % of all players, and they don't very much overlap, so they are basically each a different market, so it's not surprising that people still make paid games.

Freemium games are just a little hyped (no surprise here either: 'new' market).

So much so that investors won't even give $ to devs to make a paid game. Now, if all game dev $ goes into freebies, no wonder freebies exceed 70-80% market share. No wonder freebies LOOK ten times more attractive (and catch ten times more flies).

After the freemium market is completely saturated and the money guys don't see their $ back some will swing and put money into K-pop instead. Others might put their $ back into paid games and it will be the mysterious 'premium revival' as suddenly well produced paid games with a decent budget appear.

I guess that's why people complain that they get burned when buying paid games. Lots of paid games I buy feel cropped, like they should be 5 times longer or something.

I'd rather play 1 hours of enjoyable, immersive content than spend 30 minutes play-wondering-when-the-IAP-thing-will-kick-in-and-spoil-my-fun.
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  #18  
Old 04-16-2014, 11:49 PM
tea tea is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Topherunhinged View Post
IAP isn't crooked and shouldn't be regulated. Why should it be illegal for people to voluntarily spend their money?
The biggest IAP spenders (a) are often in a low income bracket and (b) spend pathologically, much like gamblers cannot stop themselves from risking cash they don't have.

It's unethical to use psychological hacks to con people out of money they don't even have, sooner or later a little regulation kicks in.

With all due respect to the high rollers out there who genuinely love spending $1000s on their IAPs, I think IAPs should, will be, must be regulated.

Last edited by tea; 04-16-2014 at 11:51 PM..
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