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How do I learn to create iPhone games?

10-12-2011, 05:56 AM
#1
Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 4
How do I learn to create iPhone games?

Hi there guys ... I know some php and java along with full command over html and css. What should i need to learn to create iphone apps?
10-13-2011, 03:56 AM
#2
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 286
Well it depends on what tool you want to use to create games.

Your java experience will help you with engines like Unreal and Unity 3d as both use Java like languages (UnrealScript and C# respectively). Both of these engines are really for 3d, but can be bent to do 2d as well.

Or you could go a little lower and learn Objective-C and code directly in XCode using engines such as Cocos2d or GameSalad. Both of which are aimed at 2d gaming.

A good book for one of those engines would not go astray either :-)

10-13-2011, 04:27 AM
#3
If you want to start the native programming way, I'd suggest:
Programming in Objective-C
Learning Cocos2D (for 2D games dev.)
iOS Programming by Big Nerd Ranch (for utility/Cocoa Touch apps)

There are of course free resources for everything above and with a solid foundation of general programming and OOP concepts you could do without these books, but they are excellent on-target references.

If you want to take a more visual approach and use 3rd party engines, as Luke said Gamesalad, Unity and possibly Torque (if it's still active). There are some visual cross platform tools also for utility apps, but I don't know enough about them to recommend any.

HTH,
-flod

My games: Aeterius: Contact Wars ($0.99), BUMPscape (FREE)
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10-13-2011, 08:38 AM
#4
There is also Corona. I've heard a lot of negatives about gamesalad, so I'd avoid it if you can.
10-15-2011, 04:45 AM
#5
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Australia
Posts: 1
Nice, thanks for the list of links bro. I am tempted to try making my own game for iPhone or just for fun mode.
10-15-2011, 06:14 AM
#6
Don't forget too that you can just use OpenGL directly instead of using any middleware at all. This might not be wise if you want to go the easy(/sensible!) route, but I did this for my first iOS game partly to get full control of all the rendering and not be shielded by (or be dependant on) any middleware, but mostly as I was starting out and wanted to learn Objective-C and OpenGL.

Also, if you only want to make a simple 2D game (tic tac toe, Sudoku or something without fancy fast-moving graphics), you could just do it all using UIKit (UIImageView, UIScrollView etc. that are all part of the iOS SDK)

For the time benefits though on any game with fancy graphics (especially if you want physics and/or 3D) middleware is definitely the way to go. And it also often means platform-independence.

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10-16-2011, 04:25 AM
#7
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by DemonJim View Post
Don't forget too that you can just use OpenGL directly instead of using any middleware at all. This might not be wise if you want to go the easy(/sensible!) route, but I did this for my first iOS game partly to get full control of all the rendering and not be shielded by (or be dependant on) any middleware, but mostly as I was starting out and wanted to learn Objective-C and OpenGL.

Also, if you only want to make a simple 2D game (tic tac toe, Sudoku or something without fancy fast-moving graphics), you could just do it all using UIKit (UIImageView, UIScrollView etc. that are all part of the iOS SDK)

For the time benefits though on any game with fancy graphics (especially if you want physics and/or 3D) middleware is definitely the way to go. And it also often means platform-independence.
Jim's got a good point, you dont have to use an engine if you dont need/want it.

My first game I went direct and wrote all my own code, which took WAY longer but also gave me a good understanding of the underlying hardware/software and how it all works. I did spend most of my time writing the game engine and not the game though.

So be clear on what you want to do :-) You either write a VERY simple game, or use an engine. Writing your own engine will cost you more time/money than it's worth in 99% of cases.

Last edited by Luke Kellett; 10-17-2011 at 02:33 AM. Reason: typo
10-16-2011, 07:38 PM
#8
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 184
Quote:
Originally Posted by DemonJim View Post
Don't forget too that you can just use OpenGL directly instead of using any middleware at all. This might not be wise if you want to go the easy(/sensible!) route, but I did this for my first iOS game partly to get full control of all the rendering and not be shielded by (or be dependant on) any middleware, but mostly as I was starting out and wanted to learn Objective-C and OpenGL.

Also, if you only want to make a simple 2D game (tic tac toe, Sudoku or something without fancy fast-moving graphics), you could just do it all using UIKit (UIImageView, UIScrollView etc. that are all part of the iOS SDK)

For the time benefits though on any game with fancy graphics (especially if you want physics and/or 3D) middleware is definitely the way to go. And it also often means platform-independence.

Good point. I took the OpenGL route as well, but opted for C++ vs Objective-C. It did take longer, but I honestly wouldn't have had it any other way. I enjoyed learning how everything works, and I loved gaining more experience in C++ while leaving my Objective-C skills for UIKit-based apps. It helped me in understanding some C++ example code for games.

My goal was to eventually make games for other platforms and not be dependent on a specific middleware. So it really depends on what your goal is a to what technologies you want to spend your time understanding.
10-20-2011, 03:03 AM
#9
Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 1
There are tons of bases for Flash games. There's a tutorial for everything. Very easy to play games.
10-22-2011, 09:46 AM
#10
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Vienna, Austria
Posts: 65
unity3d

If you want a really good engine try unity3d. The version for PC/Mac is free and if you try it and like it you can buy the IOS Version for 400 dollars (or maybe it was 400 euros.)
Unity really rocks.