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Composer tired of developers that are not direct and honest!

05-03-2012, 11:25 AM
#1
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 127
Composer tired of developers that are not direct and honest!

Hi,

It's been now 3 years that I am making slowly my way through that very wild jungle of the video game audio world...and I am tired of a certain pattern that seems to come back quite often...

Seriously...We all know that this is your first or second game and that you don't have a lot of money...OK!? Now that this detail is clear, do you really need to let in limbo the composer that you just contacted because you got some issues with your teammates... or your pocket...or your personal life? Wouldn't it be more simple if you just say the truth and respond to the emails you receive in a very simple and honest way?

It's not that complicated....I assure you! I have enough stress and anxiety in my life with my job and the bills and my personal projects...I really don't need to play to the game of the cat and the mouse with you guys...seriously...girls are enough for this game.

Thank you for the reading and your consideration. I hope some of you will recognize themselves and think a little bit about their music composer relations.

Dominic
05-03-2012, 12:11 PM
#2
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: Berlin, Germany
Posts: 1,674
do you expect a final goodbye email from any potential customer who contacted you...

i hope not.. you could be waiting for well... ever

05-03-2012, 12:31 PM
#3
Joined: May 2010
Location: Lincoln, UK
Posts: 344
Are you talking about developers you are already working with? Or unsolicited emails?

There is a vast difference in obligation on the developer between those 2 scenarios.

I work with a very good musician, and always reply to his emails.

As a developer I get lots of unsolicited emails, from joining trade bodies to promo code requests. Composers are one of the more common approaches. I only tend to respond to them if they are polite and personalised.
05-03-2012, 12:42 PM
#4
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 127
Well I think I should explain a little bit more then.

I said, it's been 3 years I am in the industry...I know how it works Mr. Ugly!

I am talking about a situation where the developer contacts you, and says something like: I like your portfolio! Here's some screenshots of our practically ready-to-ship game...we want this and that in the next days...is that ok for you?

And instead of being an enjoyable experience...the story slowly turns into something undesirable ...something that you're doing everything to avoid...but nothing is working.

And while you are still writing really polite and honest emails, even giving a custom demo to show your skills and what you have in mind for the project, the developer respond veryyy slowwly for a developer that wanted something asap(or doesn't even respond) and it ends up that even with the demo work you just sent nothing is moving...! I don't think it is too hard for the developper to take a little 5 minutes of his time to explain what's going on!

It's now the 4th time that this kind of situation happens to me, the first time I lost the contract...the second and 3rd time it took a lot of time to finish the contract but I have been able to work something out...and now the 4th and actual time I am still in limbo...waiting for a response after the hours of work I have put in the project.

I am sure I am not alone...I would like a little heads up on that if there is any composer that is passing by and has a similar story. Thanks.

*For Moonjump or the others....if you guys respond to the emails of your composers and that you never had problems...then you are not concerned.

Last edited by DomAjean; 05-03-2012 at 12:56 PM.
05-03-2012, 01:28 PM
#5
Joined: Apr 2011
Location: Germany
Posts: 265
Ah that happen to each and everyone with each and every kind of developers.
Programmers not getting replies from artists. Artists being left alone by programmers. Why should a composer not being hit by these sneaky persons

I totally understand your feelings. But there's not much you can do. Learn from it, one seems to get better antennas for certain shady people, or just develop a system where you get at least some form of payment for your work - upfront, whatever.

Happened to me with countless projects but over the while one can build certain relationships that will bring in more regular work and you're getting more positive collaborations and the negative experiences will fade away.

Only thing you can do is to establish some sort of ruleset for your own work ethic. Asking for x-amount upfront or the likes, if you want to go that route.

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05-03-2012, 01:40 PM
#6
Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 188
Those devs probably sent out emails to a bunch of composers--a shotgun approach. Maybe they got sticker shock. I always follow up with people I contact, but the app store has brought in legions of developers of all stripes, so I'm not surprised some may be lacking in the communications department when "crunch" time happens.

Also, it sounds like you put in some work before any agreements were made or contracts signed. Not sure why you would do this. Doesn't your body of work suffice to show what you're capable of? If you're ready to risk your time for speculative work, then just be prepared for it not to come through at times. That's the cost of doing business in this manner. Complaining about it won't change human nature or the messy nature of freelancing. You either live with it or change how you prospect for work.

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05-03-2012, 02:28 PM
#7
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 127
Hi,

Thanks for the great replies.

Yes, you got that one right...I did some work without having any green light. But that way of business have given positives outcomes in the past so that's why I went that way.

Also...I really felt in love with the game in question and it has been a long time since I wanted to compose something for that kind of game...

Maybe I went too fast or I tried to force the things a little bit too much...but now I am still waiting...a little email, even if negative, would be appreciated...o well, I will know for next time.
05-03-2012, 03:04 PM
#8
Sure some developers may not be direct and honest, but so can composers, artists, other developers to working with a developer. Why commit so much time to a project you haven't even signed yet? I think experience is the best teacher and you may be learning a good lesson here.

When I was looking for an artist, I contacted many. I can only choose 1. Many times I was waiting for a response, waiting for a quote etc. Don't commit too early and stay professional.

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05-03-2012, 03:28 PM
#9
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: Berlin, Germany
Posts: 1,674
Quote:
Originally Posted by binaryhelix View Post
Also, it sounds like you put in some work before any agreements were made or contracts signed. Not sure why you would do this. Doesn't your body of work suffice to show what you're capable of? If you're ready to risk your time for speculative work, then just be prepared for it not to come through at times. That's the cost of doing business in this manner. Complaining about it won't change human nature or the messy nature of freelancing. You either live with it or change how you prospect for work.

to add to this.. i stopped givin "free" of anything to any potential customers..

if my portfolio is not enough for them its not enough.. but freebie work they possibly try to collect from everyone they contact, is a big no go..

thoose companies are usualy wasting your time..

if your portfolio on the other hand lacks and you know it or potential clients show it to you.. then you should rather expand it with variety of examples you make from your own.. not to please some imaginary, potential or whatever client..

my 2 cents..


don't expect anything to change from them.. you are the one who needs to change in this case..

cheers
05-03-2012, 03:40 PM
#10
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 127
Well I think I stayed very professional the whole time.

But yea this thread is not only about me...it's more about all the developers and the artists here that could have been in a delicate situation for no reason...like really...these situations could be avoided if everybody would be honest.

So the next time you are not responding to an important email...think about what the other person is going through and stop thinking just about yourself, your game and your cash...

Thank you.