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iPhone: Flashback gets a major update!

05-19-2009, 11:09 PM
#1
Joined: May 2009
Location: Montreal, Canada
Posts: 79
Flashback gets a major update!

Hey everyone

Most of the things (major) people were complaining about in Flashback have been fixed, and the updated version has been submitted on app store.

Here are the details:
  • Full Screen Mode
  • Revised and significantly improved controls
  • Detailed in-game help
  • Help overlay for controls
  • Auto-rotate for left / right landscape (for Touch users)
  • Restart game

Fans of the original might be interested in this one
05-19-2009, 11:44 PM
#2
I just feel there's something very wrong in paying some X developer for porting an abandonware game and delphine software (or whoever owns flashback) not getting a penny.

05-20-2009, 01:47 AM
#3
That's the thing...nobody owns it anymore. Delphine is gone. Porting isn't exactly zero-effort, so consider that the price you're paying is for the porting work, and the rest of the game is free.

--Eric

Realmaze3D on the App Store
Realmaze3Free: 3 free mazes (a taste of Realmaze3D)
05-20-2009, 01:48 AM
#4
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2,438
Quote:
Originally Posted by JavierDavalos View Post
I just feel there's something very wrong in paying some X developer for porting an abandonware game and delphine software (or whoever owns flashback) not getting a penny.
I wrote manomi about it. This is what they said:

Quote:
No worries mate - we went to great lengths to obtain a licensing deal and spoke with original members from Delphine team. They were not interested in anything commercial with the game (I think because it's already on many abandonware sites) and said the rights were lost when the company went bankrupt.
05-20-2009, 01:49 AM
#5
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 686
"Abandonware' - no such legal term

"That's the thing...nobody owns it anymore." - Yes they do.
Why is "abandonware" illegal?
Many people are under the erroneous impression that it is legal to distribute software once the copyright holder no longer sells or supports it. Large organizations like Microsoft, Nintendo and the ESA aggressively enforce the protection of software that, in some cases, hasn't been sold or supported for 20 years. The Copyright Society of the U.S.A. explains how long copyrights last in a very understandable way.

"Copyrights in works created since 1978 will last for 70 years after the death of the work's author. If the work is what the copyright law calls a "work made for hire," created by employees within the scope of their employment, the work will last for 95 years from the work's first publication or 120 years from its creation, whichever is shorter. The provisions on copyrights in works created and published before 1978 are complicated, but, as a general rule, the copyright in those works will last 95 years. Anything first published in 1923 or earlier, though, is in the public domain."

Because software is usually created by a team of people, it is impossible to determine when 70 years from the death of the author have passed. Like motion pictures, software qualifies as work made for hire. This means that the copyright on software lasts 95 years from the date of first publication. Software written in 1984, the earliest publication date for any game on this site, will become public domain in 2079. There is presently no software for the PC platform for which the copyright has expired.
05-20-2009, 02:08 AM
#6
Quote:
Originally Posted by markx2 View Post
"That's the thing...nobody owns it anymore." - Yes they do.
Read what Arn said.

--Eric

Realmaze3D on the App Store
Realmaze3Free: 3 free mazes (a taste of Realmaze3D)
05-20-2009, 02:14 AM
#7
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 686
That does not contradict what I said.
05-20-2009, 02:32 AM
#8
Quote:
Originally Posted by markx2 View Post
That does not contradict what I said.
Which doesn't contradict what I said. Taking random IP, porting it in the name of "abandonware", and profiting from it isn't kosher, but that's not what happened with Flashback.

--Eric

Realmaze3D on the App Store
Realmaze3Free: 3 free mazes (a taste of Realmaze3D)
05-20-2009, 02:42 AM
#9
Quote:
Originally Posted by markx2 View Post
"Abandonware' - no such legal term

"That's the thing...nobody owns it anymore." - Yes they do.
Why is "abandonware" illegal?
Many people are under the erroneous impression that it is legal to distribute software once the copyright holder no longer sells or supports it. Large organizations like Microsoft, Nintendo and the ESA aggressively enforce the protection of software that, in some cases, hasn't been sold or supported for 20 years. The Copyright Society of the U.S.A. explains how long copyrights last in a very understandable way.

"Copyrights in works created since 1978 will last for 70 years after the death of the work's author. If the work is what the copyright law calls a "work made for hire," created by employees within the scope of their employment, the work will last for 95 years from the work's first publication or 120 years from its creation, whichever is shorter. The provisions on copyrights in works created and published before 1978 are complicated, but, as a general rule, the copyright in those works will last 95 years. Anything first published in 1923 or earlier, though, is in the public domain."

Because software is usually created by a team of people, it is impossible to determine when 70 years from the death of the author have passed. Like motion pictures, software qualifies as work made for hire. This means that the copyright on software lasts 95 years from the date of first publication. Software written in 1984, the earliest publication date for any game on this site, will become public domain in 2079. There is presently no software for the PC platform for which the copyright has expired.
Aww jeez, this stuff again. ... I still remember studying copyrights, trademarks, patents and how to record them in my intermediate accounting last week. I hated these problems, since it required us to make a sound and reasonable judgment on their usefulness and life to their owner. Basically an educated guess. Thank god finals are over .

Last edited by Tower Defender; 05-20-2009 at 02:45 AM.
05-20-2009, 02:51 AM
#10
Joined: Oct 2008
Location: 127.0.0.1
Posts: 389
I'm sure if the original IP owners contacted Apple, said it wasn't authorised, Apple would pull it.

And I'm sure they'd contact the dev first and ask for royalties or threaten action or something.

So in the mean time, don't worry about it.

iPad 3G: The first personal computer.