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iPhone: Marketing

12-08-2008, 05:52 AM
#1
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 59
Marketing

This could belong in one of the other forums, but I want as many people to see it as possible; it's a question not just for devs but gamers too.


For Devs:

What lengths would you go to, to market your games?

Have you had any problems getting yourself into the top 100?


Do you trust the Chart Ranking system to be representative of the most popular apps?

Would you manipulate the Chart Ranking system if it would get your app into the top 100?

For the Users:

How do you find the apps you buy?

Does the Chart Ranking (in addition to User Ratings) have any influence over your decision making?

What proportion of apps that you pay for are you happy with? Most of them? Only a few of them?

Does file (download) size influence your purchase? Do you shop from your Touch/iPhone, or from the desktop, or both? How would you feel about smaller executables and seperate (free and/or commercial) expansion packs?

How many purchases are impulse (you decide on the spot)?

Last edited by Modus; 12-08-2008 at 06:20 AM. Reason: added another 2 questions, and asked about expansions
12-08-2008, 06:05 AM
#2
Joined: Oct 2008
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 1,186
A users response

As a user I find the apps I purchase in 3 ways:

1) By viewing the appshopper.com feed
2) By recommendations from posters on this forum
3) When I use an app I enjoy I sometimes use the links in the iTunes store description to check out any other apps that developer has.

The chart ranking system has no influence over my decision making. User posted reviews in iTunes do influence me but I always am looking for considered reviews (Not just reviews that say the app/game is a "must have" or "it's fun" or "it sucks". I want to know why they think it is a must have or why it is fun or why they don't like it).

To date I have been happy with about 85% of the apps I have paid money for. However, if I was paying more overall for apps then I think my satisfaction would be lower.

12-08-2008, 06:10 AM
#3
I see the apps that I buy either on the itunes main page, or on sites like this. For non-gaming apps, I'll often make a specific search.

Chart/user ranking means little to me. I only pay attention to concise reviews, ignoring the typical 'It won't start on my iphone that I haven't restarted/is jailbroken' nonsense. I especially ignore the star ratings of free apps, as it seems people love to hand out 5 stars for below par crap on the basis that it's free (although 'rate on delete might balance things a bit). If it's poor, it should have a poor rating, else every free app might as well have a 5 star rating.

Every game that I use I've paid for. I've not found a single free game that I've wanted to keep. Other apps are mixed, but many of the better ones are not free.
12-08-2008, 06:11 AM
#4
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by snow_mani View Post
As a user I find the apps I purchase in 3 ways:

1) By viewing the appshopper.com feed
2) By recommendations from posters on this forum
3) When I use an app I enjoy I sometimes use the links in the iTunes store description to check out any other apps that developer has.

The chart ranking system has no influence over my decision making. User posted reviews in iTunes do influence me but I always am looking for considered reviews (Not just reviews that say the app/game is a "must have" or "it's fun" or "it sucks". I want to know why they think it is a must have or why it is fun or why they don't like it).

To date I have been happy with about 85% of the apps I have paid money for. However, if I was paying more overall for apps then I think my satisfaction would be lower.
Ah I forgot about things like AppShopper. Goes to show, if you don't ask...

I probably should have added:

Does file (download) size influence your purchase? Do you shop from your Touch/iPhone, or from the desktop, or both?
12-08-2008, 06:15 AM
#5
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 5
a good translation

dont forget to mention an appropriate and professional localisation:

http://forums.toucharcade.com/showthread.php?t=1244

you can check this thread.
12-08-2008, 06:17 AM
#6
Joined: Oct 2008
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 1,186
Size doesn't matter

Size doesn't matter (gee I've always wanted to be able to say that in polite company! ). BUT it does matter if there are frequent updates. For example I have a generally slow internet connection. Large files are a pain to download and if an app updates a lot then I often don't download the update until needed. I've got a few hundred apps in total and only 2 of these have been purchased or downloaded via my iphone. I do all my purchasing and downloading through iTunes on a PC. I am also limited by my measly 150MB per month allowance on my iPhone plan. Yep, only 150MB allowance per month.
12-08-2008, 06:18 AM
#7
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by TouchSF View Post
dont forget to mention an appropriate and professional localisation:

http://forums.toucharcade.com/showthread.php?t=1244

you can check this thread.
Excellent, I forgot about this thank you (Monday mornings...!).
12-08-2008, 06:22 AM
#8
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by snow_mani View Post
Size doesn't matter (gee I've always wanted to be able to say that in polite company! ). BUT it does matter if there are frequent updates. For example I have a generally slow internet connection. Large files are a pain to download and if an app updates a lot then I often don't download the update until needed. I've got a few hundred apps in total and only 2 of these have been purchased or downloaded via my iphone. I do all my purchasing and downloading through iTunes on a PC. I am also limited by my measly 150MB per month allowance on my iPhone plan. Yep, only 150MB allowance per month.
Good point.

How would you feel about seperate file downloads for large games. For example, enhanced content or more maps as something you can install alongside the main application at will?
12-08-2008, 06:24 AM
#9
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Tasmania, Australia
Posts: 775
Send a message via MSN to Paulio
Hey Modus, I'm a user
Well I find the majority of the apps that I buy to be enjoyable and hardly have any regrets after purchasing them. Once I have used a paid app, I mostly take the time to write an honest review in iTunes, some ideas for updates and give a star review relative to my experience.
In terms of using the reviews and star ratings my self depends on what the circumstance is, but mostly the reviews are made by idiots who seem to be unable to type and use normal English and the star ratings are mostly people complaining because they are generally stupid and don't know much about their device and how to use it so give it a one star review. I find this greatly annoying and will always check sites like TA and YouTube videos to see what I think of the gameplay etc.
I tend to not ‘dive’ into buying an app before I see an in game video, or read a good review. Because of this, I am pretty much always happy with my purchases and never have any regrets.
Size doesn't matter, if it looks like a good game. If it's a big download I usually make double sure I'm not downloading crap and then eagerly sit there waiting for it to finish so I can play!
Also I never download from my desktop, always on my touch. This saves me from sincing and I generally find it easier and like how you can just do it like that. No hassle.

Last edited by Paulio; 12-08-2008 at 06:29 AM.
12-08-2008, 06:51 AM
#10
As a developer I have a few things to say. If I seem bitter, I'm really not. I'm grateful for the opportunities that the App Store has given me, but there are some teething problems... which are taking a while to iron out.

Marketing - I really try to remain ethical in my marketing decisions. I don't like the way the App Store has gone with all these sales and banners and such, but it's clearly generating interest. If you can't beat em join em

Top 100 - Apple has done a very good job of making everyone have to be in the top 100 if they want any real sales volume, and as a result have driven down prices. In the early days, Chopper rose up to the top 100, and eventually got to #13 at $7.99, and with no real marketing. At $4.99 sales had dropped to almost nothing. Now at 99c, it is again rising through the top 100. I have a quality app in development that initially I was hoping to sell at $9.99. Now with the top 100 or death scenario it will be a dollar or two. I have considered dumping it multiple times as I know if it doesn't get into the top 100 it will not pay for the time I'm spending on it.

Chart Ranking System - This is changing often, and cannot be relied on. You can analyze the charts all you like, but at release time Apple might suddenly change the rules and screw up your plan. New releases now seem to have little impact on rank (which may be a good thing), but it is now with 2.2 even harder to find an app on your iPhone that is not either top 25 or released yesterday. Right now it has been 18 hours since Apple last updated the top 100. Having an app rising in the charts, this longer than usual delay is costing me. The App Store is a casino, with Apple spinning the roulette wheel while you bet your time. Sometimes it pays.

Manipulation - Depends how. If I see other apps get an unfair advantage by using underhand tactics I might use em too, as long as they do not penalize the end user. I want as many people as possible to play my games, but I have to balance this with wanting no one to feel they have been ripped off or coerced or in any way used.

Interesting questions, anyway. Cheers.