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Unity Dev Kit

07-23-2009, 05:31 AM
#1
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Slough, England
Posts: 91
Unity Dev Kit

Morning you highly talented Devs

Yet again, I have another question to ask you all.

Unity....
Now, my understanding is that this is a good dev kit to use, and seems (from the reviews and website) to be fairly graphic based. However, how much coding is knowledge is required to actually make some kind of game/app?

I've done some php/asp/javascript a long long time ago, and certainly not proficient in it. Could I / Would I be able to pick up and coding required, or is it possible to build a game on the graphical interface in a similar manner to using Hammer / UT Map Editor?

Cheers.
Matt
07-23-2009, 09:16 AM
#2
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Posts: 114
I would say that is enough knowledge to start with Unity. Unity is a mixture of graphical editing/wireing and coding. So I would recommand to go and use their trial version to test it out. :-)

07-23-2009, 10:24 AM
#3
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Slough, England
Posts: 91
What proportion is the coding? Is it imperative for any / all apps / games?
07-23-2009, 11:03 AM
#4
Yes, Unity is mostly coding. The editor is primarily about linking elements together. You could use it to build levels, though my games tend to be mostly procedurally generated. It's high-level coding, since all the low-level OpenGL stuff and so on is handled for you, but you need to be able to code to get anything done.

--Eric

Realmaze3D on the App Store
Realmaze3Free: 3 free mazes (a taste of Realmaze3D)
07-23-2009, 12:14 PM
#5
You will HAVE to learn some programming to use Unity. The graphical interface lets you position and connect objects and manage their properties, which is very important, but it doesn't create the game logic, controls, etc.--that's done via scripts (I use JavaScript) that you attach to things.

But I'd say Unity is as good a way as any to LEARN programming So jump in! If you've done some before, that's a good start.

I bought Unity because I was able to get my game running during the free trial period (actually, much quicker than that). I had done a lot of ActionScript, Lingo and PERL before that, but no C (of any flavor) and very little JavaScript. And I got into Unity just fine. That said, there's a lot of depth to learn over time.

Programming is NEVER "simple," but Unity makes it simpler than you'd think. The main reason is the zillion commands it has that do everything under the sun so you don't have to. That means it takes very few lines of code to do some sophisticated things.

Check out the Unity tutorials to get a feel for it.

Morgan Adams (GameCenter: “Adams Immersive”)
My upcoming first game: Scree (Forum thread)
My upcoming VR horror experience: This is Not the Church of the Worm (Forum thread)
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07-23-2009, 12:30 PM
#6
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Florida
Posts: 76
We use Unity3d exclusively for games. The engine is pretty solid. I've had experience with other engines (Torque, Unreal, Cocos2D), and for what it does, Unity is probably the best overall iPhone engine around.

The editor can't be beat imo. The unity forum is great for newbies and pros alike. Obj-C is alil tough to pick up if you're just starting out, let alone Open GL. Learning UnityScript aka JavaScript is MUCH easier. The UnityRemote feature alone are worth the purchase

It's not perfect, however. As of yet, there's no support for 3.0 features. The 1.1 update is supposedly around the corner that will fix many of the gripes others have mentioned, but no release date as been given. Whew hope all that helps!

brandon

brandon@solid7studios.com

Brandon L. Townes
President/Lead Designer @ Solid 7 Studios
Dev Blog
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07-23-2009, 02:11 PM
#7
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Slough, England
Posts: 91
Eeeks

Well, does sound a little daunting. I've looking through the 4 step guides written by Dave Lancaster at UnityTutorials.com, and it doesn't look to horrific - although that's not exactly a game per say.

I wanted to do a really simple remake of an old spectrum game. It's a simple platform game. the design and such I can make very easily in PS. It would be 2d as well - I assume this would make it a lot easier based on only using touch for left, right and jump/boost - and not adopting any geo-based controls or 3d...
07-23-2009, 02:40 PM
#8
2D isn't any simpler than 3D in Unity; in fact it might be a little harder (since it's basically 3D with extra constraints), although 2D does simplify control methods, that's true.

--Eric

Realmaze3D on the App Store
Realmaze3Free: 3 free mazes (a taste of Realmaze3D)
07-23-2009, 03:08 PM
#9
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Sweden
Posts: 164
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I can recommend that you download Unity as a trial and try to run through the 2d and 3d platform tutorial.

Never mind that you will not be using the iPhone version. Its more or less the same, and you can use 99% of your code directly between the end platforms.

So try out Unity, run through the tutorials, try to modify the game that comes out in the other end - and then decide if its something for you and your needs or not.

/Thomas

Thomas Hentschel Lund - Full Control ApS
ElectroCute, Smack Boxing, TouchWars, Monster Ball, Smack Hockey, Tactical Soldier, Frontline Tactics, Space Hulk
07-23-2009, 03:51 PM
#10
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Florida
Posts: 76
2D is definitely possible. Using Planes mapped with textures and Orthographic cameras are essentially 2D games. You can even use 3D models with a Z-Constrained camera for that cool 2.5D look that Rolando 2 uses. Personally, I like that flexibility alot more then a straight sprite-based engine.

Brandon L. Townes
President/Lead Designer @ Solid 7 Studios
Dev Blog
Follow Us on Twitter!