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  • Publisher: Andreas Mank
  • Genre: Strategy
  • Device: iPad
  • Size: 72.9 MB
  • Version: 1.4.34
  • Price: Free
  • Average User Rating: 4.7 (3)
App description: EMPIRE-BUILDING IN PUZZLE GAME FASHION

Try the free tutorial and if you enjoy it, buy the full game.

Set in a world of destruction, intrigue, and deception, SettleForge combines the extremely popular world of mobile PUZZLE GAMES with the rapidly emerging world of ECONOMIC SIMULATION BOARD GAMES, giving the player the feel of a multi-player tabletop game in a single-player engine.
Using familiar, yet unique environments and mechanics, players are given an opportunity to DEVELOP A WORLD of their own design that rewards both PRUDENT STRATEGIC PLANNING as well as AGILE TACTICAL ADAPTATION.

Try Empire Building : SettleForge Today!!!

Testimonials:
- "While I'm still just learning, I'd proudly give it a 4/5 so far but will happily change if I later learn of major shortcomings or that it really is even BETTER than I first thought." LORDGEK, WWW.TOUCHARCADE.COM
- "... it already sports what is quite possibly the most beautiful art Ive seen this year" OWEN, WWW.POCKETTACTICS.COM
- "I love the idea of the game and I think its great." LENA, WWW.INDIEGAMES.COM
- "Ive given it a thorough play test this morning and I do like the gameplay." MATT, WWW.CHILLINGO.COM
- "Great concept and idea ..." OLIVER, WWW.PREAPPS.COM
- "Overall, impressed ... there's more to it than meets the eye!" CHRISTOPHER, BETA TESTER
- "The game looks incredible!" GREG, BETA TESTER
- "Inexplicably, I'm a board game fanatic and still haven't bought Carcassone. But this looks awesome." MANERI

The basic rules of SettleForge can be explained in seconds yet provide near LIMITLESS DEPTH and REPLAYABILITY.
At its heart, SettleForge is a TILE-PLACING GAME in which players match the colored borders of tiles in order to build a kingdom. The challenge of the game lies in the logically-constructed PRODUCTION CHAINS and TECH TREES that these tiles are a part of.
Building simple tiles provide resources that power more advanced tiles, which in turn power even more advanced tiles. The more advanced the tile, the more progress you make towards winning the game, which can be played either as quick, one-off sessions or as part of a longer, more story-driven CAMPAIGN.

Players have much more control over the course of their game than they would with a traditional, random-deal card or tile game, yet not so much control as to be completely open-ended. Players must make DECISIONS within the limits semi-randomly generated each game in order to succeed and these successes generate still further options for development and scoring. Smart play will win out over pure fortune in nearly every game.

Maintaining the balance between managing production chains and preventing overly-limiting future tile placement options provides a mentally challenging, yet extremely rewarding experience.
But, in the end, the gameplay speaks for itself as a CHALLENGING, FULFILLING, and, most importantly, FUN entertainment experience!

Features:
- 42 unique buildings
- 4 stages
- 51 achievements
- story-driven campaign
- complex production chains
- multi-player feeling in a single-player game

Official Website: http://www.settleforge.com
Follow Us on Facebook: http://www.facbook.com/SettleForge
Support: support@unicorn-production.com
05-21-2015, 07:53 AM
#2
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Canton, Ohio
Posts: 3,197
I had wondered what happened to this, glad to see it's arrived.

05-22-2015, 08:54 AM
#3
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 12
Yes, it took a little bit longer than expected to publish SettleForge. But now I'm really proud of the result.

It's really fun to play SettleForge .. and I should know because I spend hundreds of hours with it
05-22-2015, 02:17 PM
#4
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Canton, Ohio
Posts: 3,197
Quote:
Originally Posted by settleforge View Post
Yes, it took a little bit longer than expected to publish SettleForge. But now I'm really proud of the result.

It's really fun to play SettleForge .. and I should know because I spend hundreds of hours with it
It is a ton of fun but the tutorial could use some work. It only explains the most basic parts of the game then turns you loose to figure the rest out for yourself, not the best for introducing players to a some what complex new game but at least the game does come with a rule book. I am enjoying the game and it was $4 well spent, Thank You.

Last edited by ojtitus; 05-22-2015 at 02:21 PM.
05-22-2015, 11:22 PM
#5
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 12
Quote:
It is a ton of fun but the tutorial could use some work. It only explains the most basic parts of the game then turns you loose to figure the rest out for yourself, not the best for introducing players to a some what complex new game but at least the game does come with a rule book. I am enjoying the game and it was $4 well spent, Thank You.
It is hard to find a good balance between explaining all mechanisms of a game and having a motivating tutorial. The original tutorial has explained much more, but was much longer. So I decided to reduce it. Right now, the tutorial only explains the essentials of SettleForge.

Could you give me an idea of the rules/elements, which should be explained in more detail, in your opinion?

For all german player, I will record a video with some explanations this weekend. That should help a lot

What do you think? Do you prefer a video to explain the game in more detail or do you prefer an additional tutorial?
05-23-2015, 03:39 PM
#6
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Canton, Ohio
Posts: 3,197
Quote:
Originally Posted by settleforge View Post
It is hard to find a good balance between explaining all mechanisms of a game and having a motivating tutorial. The original tutorial has explained much more, but was much longer. So I decided to reduce it. Right now, the tutorial only explains the essentials of SettleForge.

Could you give me an idea of the rules/elements, which should be explained in more detail, in your opinion?

For all german player, I will record a video with some explanations this weekend. That should help a lot

What do you think? Do you prefer a video to explain the game in more detail or do you prefer an additional tutorial?
The tutorial doesn't mention construction materials, how the dice rolls affect different elements of the gameplay, and how epochs change things.

I would prefer a thorough tutorial, it doesn't have to be motivating as long as it explains all the elements of the game.
05-26-2015, 01:17 AM
#7
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ojtitus View Post
The tutorial doesn't mention construction materials, how the dice rolls affect different elements of the gameplay, and how epochs change things.

I would prefer a thorough tutorial, it doesn't have to be motivating as long as it explains all the elements of the game.
Thank you for your feedback! It is hard for any developer to see what users may experience.

Construction materials and how the dice rolls affects them is mentioned in the tutorial. How epochs change things is explained on the campaign map. So it sounds like the information isn't mentioned at the right place at the right time. Let me make this very clear, if the tutorial provides information you think it lacks of .. then there is room for improvement.

Could you please retry/recap the tutorial give me more detailed feedback on what misses, what is unclear.
05-30-2015, 01:33 PM
#8
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: Saratoga, CA, USA
Posts: 11,780
I just finished the initial tutorial game and am liking it so far. I've only played in the game's first epoch (Bronze) which, with the guidance of the tutorial after skimming the rules, is very straight forward. Each later epoch adds significant complexity, so who knows if I'll be crying uncle soon enough.

The game is all about making production chains so as to complete the level's primary quest while, if clever enough, completing a few little sub-quests on the way for bonus points.

A production chain is as simple as placing a forest tile, and then later on, placing an adjacent lumbermill tile to that, which in turn can supply an adjacent paper mill, and so on. Just to throw in an additional minor snag to what could otherwise be fairly straight forward tile placement, these hexagonal tiles have different colored borders (only 2 different colors I believe), so that even if that 1 space would be a perfect fit for the paper mill, if you can't rotate that hex so as to have its colored borders match with the surrounding tile's borders, you can't place it there.

To add a bit of pizazz to this solo tile laying game, it also starts each turn rolling a few dice. This turn starting dice roll serves 2 purposes. The primary is to give you a random amount of building materials (while you'll always be rolling 4 d6, once you've built up your production chains a bit, you'll be using more higher quality dice with bigger values on them) but, if you end up rolling a few "diamonds" (just a single side of each die and the only non-building material result), a special event might occur. As far as I can tell these events can be either good or bad but, with the appropriate building tiles already in play, many of the bad results can be completely negated (actually be the source of positive bonus points as a reward for averting the potential disaster).

The game's campaign is a matter of taking the game's 5 kingdoms through the 4 epochs. Each kingdom has a unique starting configuration and successfully completing the level's primary goal will then unlock your ability to replay that specific kingdom in a later epoch. With each epoch many additional tiles will be added to boost the game's complexity (what started as just 2 basic production chains later will become some 6 or more intertwined bits to meddle through).

While I'm still just learning, I'd proudly give it a 4/5 so far but will happily change if I later learn of major shortcomings or that it really is even BETTER than I first thought.

UPDATE: Just played a bit of a free range game in which, in a single game you can traverse through multiple epochs. It started off simple enough but once the second epoch started things got NASTY. The concept of a tile needing MULTIPLE adjacent developed resources makes stuff REALLY tricky!

Tim "Lord Gek" Jordan, Game Consultant
Twitter: LordGek
GameCenter, iTunes: Lord Gek
My iTunes Reviews

Last edited by LordGek; 05-30-2015 at 05:41 PM.
05-31-2015, 10:16 AM
#9
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: California
Posts: 1,023
Fantastic write-up, Lord Gek!

I'm in.
06-03-2015, 01:39 AM
#10
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordGek View Post
I just finished the initial tutorial game and am liking it so far. I've only played in the game's first epoch (Bronze) which, with the guidance of the tutorial after skimming the rules, is very straight forward. Each later epoch adds significant complexity, so who knows if I'll be crying uncle soon enough.

The game is all about making production chains so as to complete the level's primary quest while, if clever enough, completing a few little sub-quests on the way for bonus points.

A production chain is as simple as placing a forest tile, and then later on, placing an adjacent lumbermill tile to that, which in turn can supply an adjacent paper mill, and so on. Just to throw in an additional minor snag to what could otherwise be fairly straight forward tile placement, these hexagonal tiles have different colored borders (only 2 different colors I believe), so that even if that 1 space would be a perfect fit for the paper mill, if you can't rotate that hex so as to have its colored borders match with the surrounding tile's borders, you can't place it there.

To add a bit of pizazz to this solo tile laying game, it also starts each turn rolling a few dice. This turn starting dice roll serves 2 purposes. The primary is to give you a random amount of building materials (while you'll always be rolling 4 d6, once you've built up your production chains a bit, you'll be using more higher quality dice with bigger values on them) but, if you end up rolling a few "diamonds" (just a single side of each die and the only non-building material result), a special event might occur. As far as I can tell these events can be either good or bad but, with the appropriate building tiles already in play, many of the bad results can be completely negated (actually be the source of positive bonus points as a reward for averting the potential disaster).

The game's campaign is a matter of taking the game's 5 kingdoms through the 4 epochs. Each kingdom has a unique starting configuration and successfully completing the level's primary goal will then unlock your ability to replay that specific kingdom in a later epoch. With each epoch many additional tiles will be added to boost the game's complexity (what started as just 2 basic production chains later will become some 6 or more intertwined bits to meddle through).

While I'm still just learning, I'd proudly give it a 4/5 so far but will happily change if I later learn of major shortcomings or that it really is even BETTER than I first thought.

UPDATE: Just played a bit of a free range game in which, in a single game you can traverse through multiple epochs. It started off simple enough but once the second epoch started things got NASTY. The concept of a tile needing MULTIPLE adjacent developed resources makes stuff REALLY tricky!
Would you mind to post your write-up on http://www.metacritic.com/game/ios/e...ng-settleforge?
And do you mind if I quote your write-up in other forums?

Last edited by LordGek; 06-03-2015 at 07:42 AM.