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Adobe: Flash Professional CS5 to support making iPhone apps

10-05-2009, 02:49 PM
#1
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: India
Posts: 1,091
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Adobe: Flash Professional CS5 to support making iPhone apps

Quote:
Adobe announced on Monday at the Adobe MAX conference that Flash Professional CS5 will support creating rich, interactive applications for the iPhone and iPod Touch.

The company demoed during the MAX keynote using Flash CS5 to export apps for the iPhone. Adobe said it leverages the same source code used to deliver applications across desktops and devices for Flash Platform runtimes – Adobe AIR and Flash Player 10.

Adobe highlighted several iPhone apps from BlueSkyNorth, Bowler Hat Games, Breakdesign, FlashGameLicense, Muchosmedia, PushButton Labs and South Park Digital Studios, using the Flash CS5 Beta.

Adobe said it is submitting other iPhone apps to the App Store, including a version of its Web conferencing solution, Adobe Acrobat Connect Pro.

A public beta of Flash Professional CS5 is expected to be available later this year, the company said.
http://www.loopinsight.com/2009/10/0...g-iphone-apps/

Quote:
Though Flash is still not available on the iPhone, Adobe announced Monday that developers will be able to export their applications created in the format within CS5 for submission to Apple's App Store.

Accordingly, Adobe launched its new "Applications for iPhone" Web page, touting the ability to build applications for the iPhone and iPod touch using ActionScript 3. The page shows three applications that were created via Flash and ported to the iPhone OS as native software.

"We've done a lot of work to make sure that applications are quick and interactive, and give you the kind of experience that you would expect from Flash, as well as the kind of experience that you've come to expect on your iPhone," said Adrian Ludwig, a member of Adobe's Flash team.

The applications currently available on the App Store are Chroma Circuit, Trading Stuff, Fickleblox, Just Letters, South Park, That Roach Game and Red Hood. All were created with a pre-relse build of Flash Professional CS5.

"What developers have to do is they have to go inside of Flash Pro and they have to export that project to a native application for the iPhone," Ludwig said. "While you're using Flash Pro to build these applications, it's being converted from .SWF to .IPA."

He noted that the method is in compliance with the iPhone developer agreement, which means the software can be submitted to the App Store for approval. The feature will be available for both PC and Mac, and a public beta is planned for later this year.
http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...p_porting.html

Last edited by thegamerocks06; 10-05-2009 at 03:56 PM.
10-05-2009, 02:53 PM
#2
Joined: Sep 2009
Posts: 330
This means the app store will turn into addictinggames.com?

10-05-2009, 03:20 PM
#3
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,237
Yeah just read this on insider and macrumors. Now if we only had a hulu app...
10-05-2009, 04:42 PM
#4
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 248
Honestly i don't think it's a matter of just pressing the "export as ipa" button and calling it a day, as a professional iphone developer that has experienced flash game total conversions to the iphone platform, the level of optimization necessary for stable framerates is quite intense, to say the least.

With 24mb of built in graphics memory on the opengl side of things, system memory limits of around 40mb, and a 500mhz processor, a flash game on a regular pc that is choking on a pentium 3 will *not* be playable on the iphone without a serious overhaul into its specific sprite sheets & texture memory limitation framework.

That being said, I look forward to experimenting with this new conversion technology that adobe is providing to see where exactly the conversion performance ceiling is.

Chris.
10-05-2009, 04:48 PM
#5
Quote:
Originally Posted by psionic View Post
Honestly i don't think it's a matter of just pressing the "export as ipa" button and calling it a day, as a professional iphone developer that has experienced flash game total conversions to the iphone platform, the level of optimization necessary for stable framerates is quite intense, to say the least.

With 24mb of built in graphics memory on the opengl side of things, system memory limits of around 40mb, and a 500mhz processor, a flash game on a regular pc that is choking on a pentium 3 will *not* be playable on the iphone without a serious overhaul into its specific sprite sheets & texture memory limitation framework.

That being said, I look forward to experimenting with this new conversion technology that adobe is providing to see where exactly the conversion performance ceiling is.

Chris.
Perhaps that optimization is happening behind the scenes, at the click of a button...

What am I saying? Adobe has not yet managed to put together a decent Flash player for the Mac. This sound like vaporware to me.
10-05-2009, 05:03 PM
#6
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Moscow
Posts: 98
10-05-2009, 05:19 PM
#7
Okay, I just tried Chroma Circuit (mentioned on the video), and it's not bad. The Flash/PC version has a number of additional features, however, including music, menu options, etc, so it's not push-button-out-comes an iPhone app process. Still, I'm impressed. I take back what I wrote above about vaporware; Flash-to-iPhone is already here.
10-06-2009, 04:04 AM
#8
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 205
They do talk about a native compiler and possibly opengl acceleration
in theory some of the code could be very fast vs interpreted code running
on a Mac/PC these days.

Or is modern flash coded Jitted on Mac/PC?
10-06-2009, 07:41 AM
#9
There's no reason a flash interpreter wouldn't fly on an iphone... especially if it's written by Adobe. So basically yes... I think you just hit publish to ipa and it will wrap your flash app with the native interpreter and you've got Flash on your phone. One app at a time.

Here's what this means, imo:

1. Hello new glut of good but mostly crappy flash apps.

2. Goodbye indie developers. I'd be surprised if this doesn't push out at least 30% of the current indie devs who were already struggling to compete. Why agonize for months over an xcode game when it gets even more buried by the wave of pro-flash developer fare on it's way.