★ TouchArcade needs your help. Click here to support us on Patreon.

Great game idea

12-18-2009, 12:38 PM
#1
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 53
Great game idea

Hey,

I have a great game idea that I think would do well.

I am not a developer.

How do I get with a developer to make my game and share in the profits.

Thanks
Joe
12-18-2009, 12:42 PM
#2
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: London, UK
Posts: 3,741
http://forums.toucharcade.com/showthread.php?t=35623

  /l、
゙(゚、 。 7 ノ
 l、゙ ~ヽ
 じしf_, )ノ

12-18-2009, 07:12 PM
#3
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 53
Oh well, I see that point of view, but not all ideas are a dime a dozen.
12-18-2009, 07:52 PM
#4
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: London, UK
Posts: 3,741
Then you've gotta do the part I mentioned, put together some kind of presentation to sell your idea... once you've done that I'm sure a few indie devs around here would have a look at it.

  /l、
゙(゚、 。 7 ノ
 l、゙ ~ヽ
 じしf_, )ノ
12-19-2009, 12:35 AM
#5
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: ,,,,,,,
Posts: 814
hey, thats a link to my thread! I probably will take your advice and create a full presentation for it. I already know things like what the control schemes could be, I just have to find some time to get it done.

And I understand, most ideas ARE a dime a dozen, but if it is well-developed and organized, then there are possibilities of reaching out to different developers.
Good Luck!

[ERROR<:>/ insert witty saying here/>]
12-19-2009, 07:26 AM
#6
Joined: May 2009
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by rudeboy690 View Post
Hey,

I have a great game idea that I think would do well.

I am not a developer.

How do I get with a developer to make my game and share in the profits.

Thanks
Joe
Joe,

Since you've read the linked post, I'll give you some brief comments that may also help.

1. A great game idea is something you should value. However, realize that a great game idea, even well implemented, does not guarantee financial success.

2. The developer is but one of many roles needed to turn a great game idea into a great game success story. At IMAK, since there are four of us, we divide things up as Project Management, Graphics, Programming, and Testing. There is also a Game Design role that we all play a part in.

3. To get a developer to share in the profits is as simple as convincing them that they will benefit (financial and/or otherwise) more from the time they spend developing your great game idea than they would by spending that time doing something else. This convincing must withstand competing offers for their talents that they may receive during the development of your game idea.

Don't give up and good luck in your endeavor!
M of IMAK

Developer at IMAK Creations, creator of ColorTilt and other lesser known apps, like That Ain't It!
Blog, twitter
12-19-2009, 09:34 PM
#7
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 53
Thanks M

I of course would be willing to do more then just tell someone an idea and expect something for it. Would want to help take it from start to finish. I am not a programmer, but have a business degree and have been in my own business for 20 years. I understand that developing a game takes a lot of work and people want to get something for there work. I guess if I want to see this I would have to put a small team together that all would hopefully benefit from each others talents.

Thanks again for the encouragement.
12-20-2009, 01:51 PM
#8
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: Brampton, Ontario
Posts: 344
Please please please do yourself a favour and read this post: http://lostgarden.com/2005/08/why-yo...e-designs.html

and this post: http://sivers.org/multiply

An idea isn't worth anything until it's executed well. Seriously.
12-20-2009, 03:44 PM
#9
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: ,,,,,,,
Posts: 814
I read those two posts and that changed my views drammatically. Thank you.

[ERROR<:>/ insert witty saying here/>]
12-20-2009, 04:05 PM
#10
Quote:
Originally Posted by abruce42 View Post
I read those two posts and that changed my views drammatically. Thank you.
I've never read those articles, but I'm glad ElectricGrandpa posted them. This is indeed the way things work in the real world.

I'd like to add to it: If your idea is really innovative, it may not be successful because it is difficult to market. There are numerous games that fall into that category. Discussing your idea might get copycats, but that isn't bad IMHO. It actually builds something and someone to compete against.

Would Coca~Cola be as popular if it didn't go up against Pepsi? The two compete and feed off each other in the market place. Sure one has to sell less, but being second place isn't a bad place to be.

A ragdoll physics platformer:Flickitty
The artist: randall schleufer
Twitter: @FlickittyiPhone