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Lauching our first game...pitfalls?

04-05-2010, 07:19 PM
#1
Joined: Apr 2010
Posts: 4
Lauching our first game...pitfalls?

Hi guys, my name is Eric, and I'm the owner of a micro-studio about to launch our first iPhone game. I've lurked around here for awile and finally decided to post(and thank you for all the threads around here, they've answered things for me before I even knew the question haha ).

Anyways, the team (6 of us) are wondering what kind of pitfalls we should be aware of before launching. We know about the fickle nature of App store approval process, how to market our game, but what I'm looking for is the stories the veterans share, about things NOT to do, what NOT to say, and how NOT to price (we are currently at 2.99 normally, with constant sales at .99 to drive up numbers).

Thanks again for having me (and us, the team is making accounts too).

What is the Point? - PointOneStudios.com
04-05-2010, 08:23 PM
#2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panzergeist View Post
Hi guys, my name is Eric, and I'm the owner of a micro-studio about to launch our first iPhone game. I've lurked around here for awile and finally decided to post(and thank you for all the threads around here, they've answered things for me before I even knew the question haha ).

Anyways, the team (6 of us) are wondering what kind of pitfalls we should be aware of before launching. We know about the fickle nature of App store approval process, how to market our game, but what I'm looking for is the stories the veterans share, about things NOT to do, what NOT to say, and how NOT to price (we are currently at 2.99 normally, with constant sales at .99 to drive up numbers).

Thanks again for having me (and us, the team is making accounts too).
Well first of all, make sure that your app is complete. Do not launch the app making promises of adding more features in future updates. I know it is difficult, but don't even mention upcoming features. Focus on the NOW, and give people a reason to buy it NOW, not a reason to wait and buy it LATER.

If you are rising steadily, do not decrease your price in the hopes of raising your numbers. If you are selling significant units, do not go FREE. The App Store has an ebb and flow that persists week after week, so while your sales may dip on Sunday, they could easily rise again by Tuesday or Wednesday. Do not take the first sign of a decline as a permanent trend.

It sounds like you have pricing figured out. I usually advise starting at $1.99, but I don't think $2.99 is absurd. I haven't seen your game, so I don't really know.

As far as what NOT to say? I think I can safely say that you shouldn't say or act the way I do.

At my age, I'm too old to give a **** what anyone thinks of me. My work either stands on its own, or it doesn't. Besides being a game designer, I am also a Graphic Designer and a Fine Artist with gallery experience. I don't spend my time crying about reviews or what the critics may say about me. They have their work, and I have mine.

I don't expect other developers to understand my attitude, because honestly, the art industry and software industry are vastly different worlds. They are probably as opposite as one can get.

A ragdoll physics platformer:Flickitty
The artist: randall schleufer
Twitter: @FlickittyiPhone
04-05-2010, 10:22 PM
#3
Joined: Apr 2010
Posts: 4
Excellent feedback. We actually had a debate about launching what we have, which is polished, but not feature complete according to the design doc. This will give more ammo to "It'll be finished when its done"

I'll be posting a preview of the game in a bit. Thanks again for the pricing suggestions.

What is the Point? - PointOneStudios.com
04-06-2010, 12:04 AM
#4
I don't want to give the impression that development time should be extended, but that is up to the developer.

If you are comfortable releasing your game in its current polished form, then by all means, release it. Development follows a standard curve- it comes to a point where adding more features do not necessarily make a better game nor does it increase sales. There is an equilibrium that can be attained.

Sometimes more features will make the game less interesting and unnecessarily complex. Sometimes, an added feature can even knock off some of that 'polish' and make the game seem unfinished.

The important fact is that the public (and reviewers) remain ignorant of the 'completeness' of your work. Let them decide if it is finished or polished, don't make the decision for them. They haven't seen your design docs, they don't know what has been left out.

Unless you tell them.

A ragdoll physics platformer:Flickitty
The artist: randall schleufer
Twitter: @FlickittyiPhone
04-06-2010, 02:32 PM
#5
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Europe, Latvia, Riga
Posts: 35
My advice - if some one said your game is bad or awful... don't listen but if some one gives an advice try to listen and if you can fulfill it.

2nd advice - try to tell users in one sentence point of your game.


PS:
In my opinion it's hard to release games now.
Year earlier it was way easier and store looked nicer.

a3team - founder
web: www.a3team.com
games in AppStore: Arco Pong, Avoid Maze, Sam the Fish