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Maybe,,,i should leave appstore now as a developer...

05-11-2010, 11:14 PM
#1
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 817
Maybe,,,i should leave appstore now as a developer...

now, many companies develop more great games for iPhone, iTouch, iPad,
they have money to employ developers, to popular, to advertise, as well they
have a great brand. at the same time as a developer of other country, not in
the United State, we have no enough competitive strength in these field but our game's quality.

so the personal developers, or small dev teams should leave appstore right now.

i have spent more than 4 months(full-time) to develop a new game 2012: Elements, and was out on appstore at 30,apirl,2010.

yeah, i try following methods to popular this game.
1. give promo code here, and other sites.
2. request TA, 148APPs,SlidePlay, appsafari, etc to write a review
(some of them dont replay you. some need work with money, so this method looks like having nothing helps)
3. make a gameplay video,and share it on Youtube, facebook.
4. drop this game price.

i try all of these methods, but the sale still badly.

so i think the chance to our games getting hit for personal developer will
never be happened, even you have developed a perfect game.

and i think wether it's time to leave appstore right now for personal developers, especially for the developers not at United State.

and where i can go ?

Last edited by adot777; 05-18-2010 at 02:07 AM.
05-11-2010, 11:21 PM
#2
Don't quit unless you need the money to survive. Game deving is a gamble, but it can be very well worth it. And so what about big companies. Gameloft releases some AWFUL unfinished games whereas EA doesn't even release games! Indie devs make the store. If your good at your job, you can find a nice publisher or such like chillingo. If your really good you can work for something like ea in your country.

Don't give up until you reach rock bottom. You just want to pull your parachute. Don't.

The Life Blog
Minecraft

05-11-2010, 11:56 PM
#3
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 249
Hey, don't give up! Many of us are not happy with the sales, so you are not alone. I guess majority are not happy and only few are laughing all way to the bank.

You've mentioned that you did work full time on it, if this is true than I understand your pain. Did you quit your day job or are you student/unemployed?

Just check what market really wants and make more simple (and somewhat stupid) games and you never know, you might get lucky.

Start your engines gentlemen, Vector Rally is out!

---
Twitter: http://twitter.com/VectorRally
05-12-2010, 12:29 AM
#4
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Argentina
Posts: 264
I think you shouldn't quit just because one game is not selling as you expected. Keep promoting it and updating it if you think it's got potential, or just move one to your next project. Maybe the next one will work better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by adot777 View Post
so i think the chance to our games getting hit for personal developer will
never be happened, even you have developed a perfect game.
You shouldn't generalize like that. There are lots examples of independent developers producing hits on the App Store. And you don't necessarily need your game to be a hit. You must have realistic expectations.

We're from outside the US too (Argentina), and we're yet to release one game that can be considered a hit, but we're doing ok nontheless. I think the key is to hope for a huge hit, but not to count on it. Put enough time and effort in your game so that you'll be compensated well enough even if your game just has average sales. If you invest a lot of resources assuming your game will be a hit, you're up for a major disappointment.

Also (and I'm sorry if it sounds a bit harsh), have you considered that maybe you haven't developed a "perfect game"? Maybe your game's not selling because people don't like it very much... Or maybe you're not communicating it the right way.

I clicked the link on you signature and had a look at the videos, screens and description of your game. To be honest, my first impression was "Inkvaders clone". If it's not, you should try to convey that more strongly. What makes your game stand appart from other side-scrolling shooters?

Another problem may be your game's name and icon. Honestly, "2012 Elements USA" means nothing. I even didn't get the reference to year 2012 until I read the description. Your icon could also use some work. While it's well drawn, it's not very good as an Icon. (Try something with more contrast, warmer colors, a clear silhouette and get rid of the default shine). Bear in mind that most people will let an app pass unless its name and icon attract them.

One last point. You should have your description checked by a native English speaker. I'm not and a quick look was enough for me to notice several mistakes and awkwardly written phrases.

I hope this helps you a bit! I know you may be discouraged, but try to hang in there Maybe try asking other devs here for help on making your game better or, if you prefer to move on, things to pay attention to for your next one.

Mariano Ruggiero // Follow me on Twitter (@ArtCoder) // Check out our games:
NEW! Elemental Rage - metroidvania-style adventure platformer
Silent Swords // Silent Swords ZERO // Crunchy Planets

Last edited by ArtCoder; 05-12-2010 at 12:33 AM.
05-12-2010, 02:01 AM
#5
Quote:
Originally Posted by adot777 View Post
so i think the chance to our games getting hit for personal developer will
never be happened, even you have developed a perfect game.
I have strong reason to believe that consumers of the appStore is not actually looking for a "perfect" game. On the contrary, actually i think app store is really the place where "imperfect" games shines. Theres a lot of successful "stick man" or sketch figure games in the app Store, compared to for example NDS, PSP or any other consoles.

We are also from outside of the US too (Indonesia), released two games so far and one of them is not doing good at all atm.
05-12-2010, 03:50 AM
#6
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 4,461
Quote:
Originally Posted by mean_monkey View Post
I have strong reason to believe that consumers of the appStore is not actually looking for a "perfect" game. On the contrary, actually i think app store is really the place where "imperfect" games shines. Theres a lot of successful "stick man" or sketch figure games in the app Store, compared to for example NDS, PSP or any other consoles.

We are also from outside of the US too (Indonesia), released two games so far and one of them is not doing good at all atm.
It's a shame Defender Chronicles isn't selling better, it's my favorite tower defense game and in my overall top 3 favorite games in the App Store.

Speaking of PSP, do you plan on porting it to the PSP?

I read something on the DC forums, but it didn't seem the platforms you guys wanted to port the game to was decided yet.
05-12-2010, 04:38 AM
#7
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 771
There are so many apps on the store, you'll have to create something unique now. Look at simple games like Fruit Ninja for example, don't think the developer of that game is very big (?) and they do real well.

Create something unique, with an added network like Plus+, OpenFeint, Crystal etc. You can still do this!

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Game Center ID: mvanbeem
05-12-2010, 07:06 AM
#8
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: UK / Toronto
Posts: 602
Quote:
Originally Posted by adot777 View Post
now, many companies develop more great games for iPhone, iTouch, iPad,
they have money to employ developers, to popular, to advertise, as well they
have a great brand. at the same time as a developer of other country, not in
the United State, we have no enough competitive strength in these field but our game's quality.

so the personal developers, or small dev teams should leave appstore right now.

i have spent more than 4 months(full-time) to develop a new game 2012: Elements, and was out on appstore at 30,apirl,2010.

yeah, i try following methods to popular this game.
1. give promo code here, and other sites.
2. request TA, 148APPs,SlidePlay, appsafari, etc to write a review
(some of them dont replay you. some need work with money, so this method looks like having nothing helps)
3. make a gameplay video,and share it on Youtube, facebook.
4. drop this game price.

i try all of these methods, but the sale still badly.

so i think the chance to our games getting hit for personal developer will
never be happened, even you have developed a perfect game.

and i think wether it's time to leave appstore right now for personal developers, especially for the developers not at United State.

and where i can go ?
I had a look at your thread — why are giving away so many promo codes? On the first page of your game topic you're offering 30 free codes for anyone who PMs you; I don't feel this is the right way to encourage sales.

Giving away copies seems to be a popular promotion method for App store devs, not because it's effective, but because it's one of the few things available for developers on iTunes Connect and I think some developers cling to it as some sort of outlet for promotion. But, the problem with giving away promo codes so carelessly and alongside your primary methods of promotion (forum threads), is that people get the impression they don't need to buy the game; even if they're unable to get one of the first few promo codes, they can easily assume there will be more, or that the game will release for free eventually. It's very dangerous to be liberal with the value of your game; I believe you should pick a fair price and stick to it, even when sales are slow.

I don't think your game is bad actually — I feel your problem isn't the market, but your marketing. I would suggest a clear marketing campaign focusing on an aspect of the game, whether it's the lead character, the main enemy, or some other aspect of the game. All games need a hook, whether it's a feat of stunning graphics, never-done-before openworldness, presents a huge challenge like GeoDefense, offers an innovative control scheme, or just a humorous focus on a big joke about the game. Scribblenauts is a great example of a simple-looking game but the developers pushed its "draw anything" mechanic and got huge press from that. Any sort of spin you can do to give gaming bloggers a hook to talk about is what you're aiming for. You can achieve this sort of thing by teaming up with a promoter or marketer.

Don't give up just yet!

Last edited by EssentialParadox; 05-12-2010 at 07:12 AM.
05-12-2010, 09:11 AM
#9
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 817
Quote:
Originally Posted by The prez 12521 View Post
Don't quit unless you need the money to survive. Game deving is a gamble, but it can be very well worth it. And so what about big companies. Gameloft releases some AWFUL unfinished games whereas EA doesn't even release games! Indie devs make the store. If your good at your job, you can find a nice publisher or such like chillingo. If your really good you can work for something like ea in your country.

Don't give up until you reach rock bottom. You just want to pull your parachute. Don't.
it's seem to I have reach rock bottom right row...
05-12-2010, 09:15 AM
#10
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 817
Quote:
Originally Posted by EssentialParadox View Post
I had a look at your thread why are giving away so many promo codes? On the first page of your game topic you're offering 30 free codes for anyone who PMs you; I don't feel this is the right way to encourage sales.

Giving away copies seems to be a popular promotion method for App store devs, not because it's effective, but because it's one of the few things available for developers on iTunes Connect and I think some developers cling to it as some sort of outlet for promotion. But, the problem with giving away promo codes so carelessly and alongside your primary methods of promotion (forum threads), is that people get the impression they don't need to buy the game; even if they're unable to get one of the first few promo codes, they can easily assume there will be more, or that the game will release for free eventually. It's very dangerous to be liberal with the value of your game; I believe you should pick a fair price and stick to it, even when sales are slow.

I don't think your game is bad actually I feel your problem isn't the market, but your marketing. I would suggest a clear marketing campaign focusing on an aspect of the game, whether it's the lead character, the main enemy, or some other aspect of the game. All games need a hook, whether it's a feat of stunning graphics, never-done-before openworldness, presents a huge challenge like GeoDefense, offers an innovative control scheme, or just a humorous focus on a big joke about the game. Scribblenauts is a great example of a simple-looking game but the developers pushed its "draw anything" mechanic and got huge press from that. Any sort of spin you can do to give gaming bloggers a hook to talk about is what you're aiming for. You can achieve this sort of thing by teaming up with a promoter or marketer.

Don't give up just yet!
1. innovative control scheme
2. humorous

yeah,these are important... thanks your great suggestion.