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Assembling an A-Team

12-30-2010, 02:10 AM
#1
Joined: Dec 2010
Location: Outer Space
Posts: 411
Assembling an A-Team

After reading posts after posts and buying game after game, i am thinking to myself, why not come up with a game? But is it that easy?

Sure i can outsource and spend money. But i want to take a different approach.

I want to assemble a team from different parts from the world working on a common goal - to make simple yet fun iDevice games. Sounds far-fetched. Well, i figure i might as well try otherwise i will always wonder what if...

The Team -

1. A project manager (to keep everyone on schedule and outline of game)
2. 1-2 programmers (for coding purposes)
3. A sound designer (for musical reasons)
4. A graphics designer (to bring the game visually alive)
5. A marketing guy (to bring the game to the masses)

As long as you WANT to do this and have the passion, anyone is welcome. I know there are people who want to work alone and like to say, you know what? I did this project on my own. But there is no shame in asking for help and getting the right people to do the job and that's what i am doing...

So are the guys going to do this for free? Hell, no! I wouldn't... But i propose a share of the profits - an equal amount (after Apple's profit). In that way, we know we are working hard towards a paycheck. Coz we all need to rely on each other to make it work.

So what do you say guys? Would you like to make something happen today?

Message me here or PM me. Either way... Let's make it work.
12-30-2010, 03:54 AM
#2
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Hollywood, CA
Posts: 1,869
it's a nice and noble thought, but you'll quickly learn it's difficult to blow the doors open and say "we got a war to win gents.. who's with me?"

This is the part where you have to present something to tempt those who would read your post, and it needs to have some value. Who are you, what's your background, what differentiates you from the countless other folks who could possibly build "the next big thing?" Hopes and dreams don't get too far on their own, but showing off a pertinent resume, even some visual samples of what you want to do (or to demonstrate what you are already capable of) will go a long way to getting some attention and sparking some beginnings of conversation.

So, what have you got?

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12-30-2010, 04:10 AM
#3
Joined: Dec 2010
Location: Outer Space
Posts: 411
i have a dream..

ha ha But seriously..

i get where you are coming from. And for those who reply, i will make the necessary introductions. A lil about myself if that i WAS in the forefront of technology for the past 3 years and now i prefer to be in the dungeons working and making things happen. Being in the thick of new ideas has always brought me joy and i feel there is no such thing as too many cooks spoiling the broth.

I have gotten a few replies so i will be setting up a conference call with people once the positions are filled and we can start talking.

It all starts with a friendly HELLO and we will take it from there.
12-30-2010, 04:12 AM
#4
Joined: Dec 2010
Location: Outer Space
Posts: 411
Just downloaded 180... can't wait to play it..

Quote:
Originally Posted by headcaseGames View Post
it's a nice and noble thought, but you'll quickly learn it's difficult to blow the doors open and say "we got a war to win gents.. who's with me?"

This is the part where you have to present something to tempt those who would read your post, and it needs to have some value. Who are you, what's your background, what differentiates you from the countless other folks who could possibly build "the next big thing?" Hopes and dreams don't get too far on their own, but showing off a pertinent resume, even some visual samples of what you want to do (or to demonstrate what you are already capable of) will go a long way to getting some attention and sparking some beginnings of conversation.

So, what have you got?

__________________
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12-30-2010, 05:37 AM
#5
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: australia
Posts: 899
I was hoping there would be a writer (the story etc.) part in here.
12-30-2010, 06:43 AM
#6
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 659
the only time there's too many cooks in the kitchen is when profits are being split evenly...and the programmers are doing like 90% of the work.

Not saying that's your situation but I've had that happen to me before.
Maybe someone else had a better experience where that situation worked out.

Last edited by 99c_gamer; 12-30-2010 at 06:50 AM.
12-30-2010, 08:00 AM
#7
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Hollywood, CA
Posts: 1,869
I am sure it's been a similar situation before, where people join up remotely from all over the place. to varying degrees of success, for all manner of projects - but it's absolutely been magnified in the case of iPhone developments (as there's been such a surge of hobbyist and indie development the past couple of years). So many times I have heard the same tragic story, where Group X will get some degree of the way through development before the wheels came off the wagon (pretty much, the programmer decided it was no longer interesting to them)

And this isn't to sound like "ohhh the programmers are the bad guys," it's more like the people actually leading the projects have no idea exactly how much they are biting off and what amount of work to expect across the board (and to echo what 99c_gamer said, a lot of the time the bulk of the work will land on the coders' shoulders)

My advice, particularly if you are putting together a group of folks who've not collaborated before (and especially if there's no money to start with) would be to work on something small together, unambitious, to learn the process/pipeline and gauge your chemistry together. You'll absolutely expose the flaws in the system and learn what is possible, who is good at what, and from there you'll be able to plan for bigger and better projects. You may not wind up with a wonderful end result out of that 1st project, but you'll absolutely be primed and prepared to start fresh on something bigger with a much better idea of what to expect.

Certainly there's all sorts of different philosophies of how to go about this, I am only presenting one, but based on what I know and have experienced (1st hand on a small level, and likewise at much larger companies) and moreover what I have heard echoed many times by countless others in this particular scene, it's a very logical way to go forward. Good luck!
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12-30-2010, 09:00 AM
#8
1

Actually, if you get the artwork done and audio youreally need only 1 programmer that is what I was told by a very top company head.

Quote:
Originally Posted by headcaseGames View Post
I am sure it's been a similar situation before, where people join up remotely from all over the place. to varying degrees of success, for all manner of projects - but it's absolutely been magnified in the case of iPhone developments (as there's been such a surge of hobbyist and indie development the past couple of years). So many times I have heard the same tragic story, where Group X will get some degree of the way through development before the wheels came off the wagon (pretty much, the programmer decided it was no longer interesting to them)

And this isn't to sound like "ohhh the programmers are the bad guys," it's more like the people actually leading the projects have no idea exactly how much they are biting off and what amount of work to expect across the board (and to echo what 99c_gamer said, a lot of the time the bulk of the work will land on the coders' shoulders)

My advice, particularly if you are putting together a group of folks who've not collaborated before (and especially if there's no money to start with) would be to work on something small together, unambitious, to learn the process/pipeline and gauge your chemistry together. You'll absolutely expose the flaws in the system and learn what is possible, who is good at what, and from there you'll be able to plan for bigger and better projects. You may not wind up with a wonderful end result out of that 1st project, but you'll absolutely be primed and prepared to start fresh on something bigger with a much better idea of what to expect.

Certainly there's all sorts of different philosophies of how to go about this, I am only presenting one, but based on what I know and have experienced (1st hand on a small level, and likewise at much larger companies) and moreover what I have heard echoed many times by countless others in this particular scene, it's a very logical way to go forward. Good luck!
__________________
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Puzzling has Evolved - Get 180 for FREE until 2011! - Contest
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12-30-2010, 09:12 AM
#9
Joined: Nov 2010
Posts: 274
Quote:
Originally Posted by 99c_gamer View Post
the only time there's too many cooks in the kitchen is when profits are being split evenly...and the programmers are doing like 90% of the work.

Not saying that's your situation but I've had that happen to me before.
Maybe someone else had a better experience where that situation worked out.
Really? I think for iphone games it's the other way around. What matters the most is the art (there are lot of mediocre to bad games with great art that are a success). Great games with bad art are much less likely to succeed.

In my case I can tell you that the split between art and code was easily 70/30 if not more skew towards art (and I should know since I did both and was equally unexperienced at both as well).

In any case it's hard to determine the exact split between artists and coders so usually 50/50 is chosen. The sound guy getting an equal share though I find questionable, unless it's a music game.

I don't know about you guys, but I don't think I'd spend over 10% of my whole game budget on sound. I'd love to know what percentage you guys allocate to that.
12-30-2010, 10:25 AM
#10
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 659
artist/programmer contribution are both important it can lean one way or the other depending on game type.

I've mainly worked on action games which tend to be heavy on the programming side.
I have another game on the backburner that's sort of a cut the rope style game involving physics. A 1 screen game that the artist finished up in about a week and it looks good but I probably need another 2 months to finish the coding, level design, difficulty progression, game center achievements, etc.