Dawn of Design Game Design Video Blog

03-29-2011, 07:31 PM
#1
Dawn of Design Game Design Video Blog

I have some things I want to vent out about game design, but not to bore you with long posts I decided to try a video format. Only instead of watching me talk you rather enjoy a time-lapse drawing of the illustration that I made for the topic.



There is also a loose script if you prefer reading.

Discussion:
I know the things I talk about are a matter of taste and I respect everyone's choice in what kinds of games you like to play. But still, I hope some of you can relate to the frustration I'm feeling about the games industry and their approach to the design process as well as the lack of games that focus on creation and learning versus those revolving around destruction as one of their main game mechanics (shooting/fighting).

And I don't think the Farmville clones help either, even though they are technically about creation. Coming from long years of playing great tycoon games (Theme Park, Sim City, Transport Tycoon, Rollercoaster Tycoon, The Sims), if I see another isometric city/restaurant/bakery/farm/nightclub/treasure/empire game without any real simulation I'm going to ... Well, you'll see soon enough what I'll do, because I'm sure they'll keep coming ...

So is there really not enough gamers wanting a challenge where in the process you learn something new, improve and gain real world knowledge, creativity or inspiration?
03-29-2011, 08:32 PM
#2
I enjoyed watching the artwork take form.

And I'm off to look-up 'Shadow of the Colossus'.

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03-29-2011, 09:16 PM
#3
Oh, definitely. It's a PS2 title that's getting a PS3 re-release sometimes this spring. A game unlike no other, truely unique for-the-game designed game mechanics. And amazing atmosphere/emotions. Uh, you're making me want to run home from the office and go play right now.
07-10-2011, 06:34 AM
#4
It's been a while, but here's the second part in our video blog on game design. After choosing to try and create games focused on creating things, I looked at the market if there really is demand for such games.



Here's the final illustration: